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Digital Nomad

An Interview with Jennifer Lachs, Founder of the Digital Nomad Girls Community

By | Digital Nomad, Guest Blog, Interview | No Comments

Entrepreneur and founder of the ‘Digital Nomad Girls’ community, Jennifer Lachs is nothing but positive energy!

At Sun and Co. we had the pleasure to host her community of remote workers and female entrepreneurs twice already, and she’s coming back for the third time in June 2019 to run her Digital Nomad Girls Retreat.. Guess where? At Sun and Co. in Javea, of course 🙂

We sat down with Jennifer to talk about how she got the inspiration to start her business, the joys and challenges of life on the road, and how her view of ‘digital nomadism’ has changed with time.

Without saying anything about work, tell us a little bit about who you are and what you value.

I’m a bit of a contradiction actually. In a way I’m a free spirit, but I also have a very analytical, scientific mind. I’m an adventurer, but also a chicken. I love backpacking, exploring all corners of the world but am happiest in Disneyland.

I value friendship and connection, freedom of choice, freedom to explore and the freedom to learn new skills and reinvent myself.

I love food and think it’s one of the greatest pleasures in life to discover new dishes from around the world. My favourite dishes are ceviche, soup dumplings and laksa soup but I love everything to do with noodles or dumplings.

So, what do you do that allows you to be location independent?

It’s a long story, but now I run my own business called Digital Nomad Girls. It’s a community that brings together location independent women from around the world. I’ve run retreats and also have a membership site ‘The DNG Inner Circle’, a virtual coworking community that travels with you.

In the past I was a chemist and then became a freelancer after backpacking and gallivanting around the world for nearly 2 years.

What inspired you to start Digital Nomad Girls? Did it come from a lack of representation or more of a longing to create community?

To be honest, a bit of both. After travelling for a good few years I was really missing having close girl friends. And at the same time I noticed I was often the only girl at coworking spaces or digital nomad events. The online business world can also be quite loud and a bit overwhelming for women I think. So I had the idea to start a Facebook group to meet other girls who were trying to do the same thing as me. And it seemed there was a big need for it at the time.

How would you say that working remotely has impacted your life?

Wow, it has completely changed it. I studied chemistry and have a PhD in it too, so most of my 20s were spent in research labs and immersed in academia. Once I broke free from this to travel the world I knew there was no way back really. Being able to work remotely has opened so many doors. I think if I hadn’t discovered the digital nomad lifestyle I would either be working in a chemistry job I’d resent or be stuck in the work-save-money-travel cycle.

But more than that, working remotely has allowed me to meet hundreds of amazing women (and men) from all over the world, make new friends and even become an entrepreneur. It’s opened a lot of doors for me.

What’s the biggest thing you struggle with while on the road?

Well there are a few things actually, and I think it’s super important to talk about the ups and downs of this lifestyle. Work-life balance and productivity are definitely big challenges but if I had to pick just one thing I’d say it’s a lack of community. Thankfully, I am meeting incredible people all the time and I make new friends quite easily. But it’s hard to have to say goodbye to new friends all the time, and it doesn’t really get easier. That’s why online communities are so important for us digital nomads.

You’ve been here with us at Sun and Co. a few times. How would you describe your experience here to someone who is on the fence about coliving?

Yes, twice already! And well, I’m a little biased because I think you guys are amazing and that Sun and Co is incredible. Apart from the beautiful house and the lovely town (seriously, Javea is dead cute) I think you’d struggle to find many coliving spaces that care so much about their colivers. As soon as you arrive at Sun and Co you feel like you’ve arrived home. The other colivers were always super friendly and open, the vibe is very relaxed, no-pressure but fun and a bit adventurous. I would love to spend time at Sun and Co every year, to get lots of work done and hang out with awesome people.

If you’re on the fence, don’t even think about it anymore and just book! I can’t think of a single thing that I don’t like about Sun and Co. Oh well, maybe that there isn’t one in every city.

Being a digital nomad full-time can sometimes be hard. How would you explain your personal transition over the years from constantly traveling to choosing one place as your “home base”?

Yes it can definitely be exhausting. I think after 3 years of almost full time travel including 1 year of jumping from city to city every month while working basically full-time, I needed a break. It’s hard for a digital nomad to say, ok, I’m staying here for a while and I won’t move. But you have to listen to yourself and your body. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with travelling slowly, or having a home base. I think that’s so important to know.

At the same time, what I am experiencing now is that it’s equally important to listen to yourself when it’s time to move on. It’s easy to get comfortable and get used to your routine. But too much of that is also not good and I noticed over the past months that I was getting itchy feet. I was nervous to hit the road again full-time but since booking the flights I am just excited to travel more again and explore new countries.

When do you feel you’re happiest?

Woah, that’s an awesome question. I think when I am meeting new people and making new friends. When I’m connecting with people who have similar dreams and goals as me. I think some of my happiest weeks have been during the DNG retreats, two of which were in Javea.

Oh and when I eat really good food with my boyfriend Simon.

What is one thing you wish you knew before starting your location independent journey?

There’s no right or wrong way to be a digital nomad and travel. Don’t listen to the gurus, to people who want to teach you how to live this life. You have to figure it out yourself and your travel style also adapts over time.

One thing you can’t leave home without?

Oh so many. My ear plugs and sleeping mask for practical items and my hula hoop for fun.

Imagine that you had one month to travel anywhere in the world (money not being an issue), where would you go and why?

Such a hard question. (20 minutes later…) My first thought was India but it’s such a cheap destination that I think I’ll go with Italy. I absolutely adore Italy and would love to drive around for a month, take cooking classes, stay in little villas, eat cheese and drink wine all day. Sounds like a dream.

Or for something more exotic, definitely Japan. I’d love to see the cherry blossoms and eat my way around the country.

Lastly, where do you see yourself/what do you see yourself doing one year from now?

One year from now I might still be in Mexico or maybe in the States on a road trip. I’ll still be working on DNG and my membership site, the DNG Inner Circle, and I’ll be organising a retreat in Mexico. Or maybe I’ll be back in Europe and living in Sicily for a few months.

Rapid Fire

Window or aisle?  Window

Carryon or overweight?  Overweight!

Favorite city you’ve visited? Sydney

Favorite tool for remote work? Asana and Bear

What song do you currently have on repeat? The Moana soundtrack

Anything else you want to share?

I’m so glad that there are spaces and communities like Sun and Co. who make the digital nomad experience so much easier and more fun. Thanks for what you do guys and I can’t wait to return soon!

Where can we find you on the web and social media?

You can find me on my website digitalnomadgirls.com, on Instagram and in my Facebook Group.  

Interested in joining the next Digital Nomad Girls retreat in Javea? Get in touch with Jenny and mention you’ve heard of her through Sun and Co. to get €200 off the normal price ticket!

How I Became A Digital Nomad: Lessons Learnt From My Time With Remote Year Program

By | Community, Digital Nomad, The Team | No Comments

Two years ago I quit my office job in London, sold all my stuff, packed my life in a 23kg suitcase, said goodbye to all my friends and flew to Colombia to start my year-long adventure working as a Program Leader with the Remote Year program. It was like they basically invented my dream job and then offered it to me. I was over the moon, and terrified.

By the end of March 2017 I had successfully led a community of 50+ digital nomads, who were working remotely and travelling around the world. For 12 months we lived in 12 different cities across Europe, Asia and South America, always together.  Intense? I felt like I’d aged 5 years in 12 months, and sometimes struggled to understand how profoundly the experience had changed me.

The thing is, travelling always changes you in some ways. But travelling as part of a community is a completely different story. Here’s three important lessons I learned in the process.

Stop talking, start listening

When you’re constantly travelling from place to place and meeting new people that are also doing the same, you want to be able to create meaningful relationships in a short period of time. You quickly realise you don’t have the time nor the energy for small talk. But if you step back and take the time to really listen to others, you’ll be able to tune in very quickly with whoever you meet. Everyone has an interesting story to tell, and it’s often not what you were expecting.

No matter how open-minded and well-travelled you are, you will judge

Being forced to spend time with people that I wouldn’t normally choose to hang out with in a familiar environment made me realise how often we tend to judge a book from its cover. Back home, we tend to stick to people that we feel are similar to us and make us feel comfortable. However, if we take the time to dig deeper and push through the initial ‘awkward’ feeling, we will find that people that are very different from us are those that we should seek out and hang out with more often. They are the ones that would offer us a different perspective and really make us richer individuals.

Location independent work is the future, and communities are the key. As long as they foster vulnerability

Before I started to travel with a bunch of 50+ strangers, I had heard the term ‘tramily’ (travel + family) a few times from previous colleagues at Remote Year. And I was skeptical. I thought there was no way I would get attached to these people, as nice as they were, to the point that I would call them ‘family’. Once again, I was wrong. Travelling for a long period of time will eventually make you feel uncomfortable and push you to your limit, revealing who you really are and hence making you vulnerable. Nobody likes their dark sides to be exposed, but when your insecurities and fears are revealed and you have no choice but opening up about who you really are, that’s when the deepest sense of connection arises. Vulnerability is the most powerful tool for creating communities that really feel like families. It allows others to better understand you, accept you and love you for who you are; it instantly erases the defensive walls that we all build and that prevent us to have real, meaningful, heart-to-heart connections.

A year after saying goodbye to my Remote Year program and tramily, I find myself starting a new adventure at Sun and Co. I am excited to have the opportunity to witness and spread the word about coliving, a new way of living and working for digital nomads based on communities, collaboration and meaningful connections. It’s a revolutionary concept that is hard to explain and understand without having experienced it.

If you’re skeptical, like I was, you just need to come and try. You’ll never want to go back 🙂

What being a digital nomad means for your taxes

What Being a Digital Nomad Means for Your Taxes

By | Business, Digital Nomad, Guest Blog | No Comments

As a digital nomad, what are the tax issues that you need to be aware of? How is income reported, what provisions are there for full-time travelers, and what are the pitfalls? While location independent work is on the rise, tax regulations struggle to keep up with it and there are still a lot of grey areas in the matter. Regulations also vary greatly from country to country, so it’s always recommended to do some research of your own or talk to a tax professional.

However, if you are a US citizen digital nomad you’re in luck! We spoke with Krystal Pino, seasoned accountant, digital nomad and founder of Nomad Tax, a firm dedicated serving the nomad community when it comes to small business and personal tax issues.

Keep reading to find out Krystal’s recommendations when it comes to dealing with taxes for US digital nomads.

Krystal Pino

 

Making a Federal Case Out Of It

First and foremost: the foreign earned income exclusion (FEIE). The tax code provision states that if you are outside of the United States for either a set number of days, or you’re considered a resident of another country, you could be exempt from paying federal income taxes on a portion of your income ($103,900 for 2018 and $104,100 for 2019). Hold your horses though, it’s not automatic simply because you’ve decided to travel. There are tests that need to be met.

First is either the bona fide resident test or the physical presence test. Under the bona fide resident test, you’re considered exempt should you qualify as a resident of another country for a full calendar year. For those of us constantly on the move, there’s the physical presence test (PPT). Under the PPT, you need to be outside of the United States for 330 out of 365 rolling days (which means you can use any 365 day period, not just January-December).

Once you pass the PPT, the next thing the Internal Revenue Service wants to know is where your tax home is. For our FEIE purposes, this tax home is not your residence, or abode (discussed later), but rather refers to how and where you make your money. If you’re self employed, you make your money wherever you are. Congrats, you’ve passed the second test!

W-2 employees take a little bit of an extra look at the nature of their work and assignment. You’re going to have to convince the IRS that your remote work is for the benefit of your employer and not only personal. Not impossible, but it weakens your case for the FEIE.

But wait! We’re not done yet!
The last thing the IRS takes a look at is what is called your ‘abode’. This is a referral to your social, family, and economic ties to the United States. Own a home in the US and not renting it out? Still voting in local elections? Have a car registered? Strong family ties? While none of these automatically disqualify you from the FEIE, they could potentially weaken your case that the US is not your permanent home, and this lifestyle of travel is only temporary for you and you’re trying to get out of paying taxes for a bit.

Self(ish) Employment Taxes

Another important thing to note when considering the FEIE is that it only applies to FEDERAL income taxes. None of us are exempt from paying social security and Medicare taxes. Good news for W-2s: you get to split this with your employer, and it is already taken care of for you. Those of us who are self employed are responsible for the full burden (12.4% for Social Security and 2.9% Medicare), although a credit is offered for half. Self employed and don’t want to deal with SE tax? You can mitigate your SE tax by setting up your business as an S Corporation, but this does subject you additional tax filings.

State of Affairs

So, what about state taxes? While some states do have foreign earned income exclusion provisions, most of the time you’ll still be subject to state taxes. Traveling full time? CA, CT, DE, ID, MN, MO, NY, OK, OR, and WV all offer safe harbor provisions, provided you’re out of the state for a number of days and subject to other residency requirements.

State residency is another hot topic among US digital nomads and something my firm looks at intently. Residency can be both hard to break and to establish, especially when trying to do it from overseas. Thus, consider it before you leave or talk to someone who’s already done all the leg work.

Deductions Reasoning

Finally, another frequent question I get is “what can I deduct?” 
If you’re a W-2 employee: nothing. Sorry. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act basically got rid of anything you could previously deduct.
For self-employed individuals, the answer is: it depends. First, consider the nature of your business and the nature of your travel. The IRS states heavily that business expenses must have a clear business purpose, and nothing that is considered personal is allowed. What you can deduct include coworking space fees, trips made specifically for client/business work, meals with clients, and professional fees, which are still deductible simply as if you were sitting still.

Congratulations, you made it this far! Dealing with taxes can be daunting, but it should be on your top priority list when planning your life on the road.

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Diverse Representation As a Digital Nomad; An Interview with Kit Whelan

By | Community, Digital Nomad, Interview, Remote Worker, Travel | No Comments

Kit Whelan is one of those passionate people that you meet and instantly feel inspired to be a better person and change the world. We had the honor of spending time with her at the 7in7 conference as well as afterward, as they hosted the Nomad House here at Sun and Co. 

We decided to sit down with Kit to hear a bit more about how she’s able to be location independent, the importance of diversity in the digital nomad world, how we need to be redefining the future of work in the next 20 years and so much more! 

Without saying anything about work, tell us a little bit about who you are and what you value.

I LOVE this question! I’ve been a digital nomad for 9 years and the only thing I miss about muggle life is being able to have a cat – I’m a certified crazy cat lady! The best thing about my life is my awesome community of location independent humans all over the world who support me through life’s ups and downs. They help me become the best person I can be. I’m never without my amazing friends.

Aaaand does running a conference count as work if it’s an all-volunteer project? Because I started a conference to make more friends. That’s how important community is to me 🙂

I also plan to travel in space one day, hopefully to Mars.

So, what do you do that allows you to be location independent?

I’m a social media consultant, mostly for small luxury hotels.

 

Tell us a little bit about why you started the 7in7 conference.

“This bromad culture turned off so many people that a lot of my friends refused to call themselves digital nomads. They couldn’t stand to be associated with those types of people. Something had to change.”

 

We started 7in7 out of frustration. First, frustration with the lack of representation in the nomad community. EVERYWHERE you looked it was all straight, white, Western men. Every conference, meetup, article, podcast… all white guys talking about how to “crush it” at life. This bromad culture turned off so many people that a lot of my friends refused to call themselves digital nomads. They couldn’t stand to be associated with those types of people. Something had to change.

Secondly, frustration that there were so many events geared toward getting people into the location independent lifestyle, but nothing for those of us who had already been nomads for a while. We had already figured out the basics – starting a business or getting a remote job, the logistics of travel, etc. But there’s so much more to life than that: building a community, being a socially responsible global citizen, deciding whether or not to have kids on the road… we needed a space to have these conversations.

So, we started our own.

As for doing it on seven continents… that bit is just for fun! 🙂

 

Since starting 7in7, how have you seen your network change?

Oh my gosh! People say if you want to increase your visibility you should speak at conferences… that’s true. But if you want to increase your network, and fill your global village with wonderful humans, start your own event! I have met such incredible people over the last three years! And they introduce me to their friends, and their friends, and on and on. Anything I need, there’s someone in my network who can help me get it. They push me to be better. They offer their skills to create a better world. They are everything to me.

The focus of the conference is for “experienced digital nomads”.

 

Tell us a bit about why you chose to focus on those who have been traveling and working for years.

Yes, this is a bit controversial. We are the only event I know of for experienced location independent people (those who have been at it for more than one year) and that’s intentional.

When you’ve been a nomad for 3, 5, or 15 years, you often find yourself in spaces where you are the most experienced person in the room. You end up being asked questions by everyone else, and of course, you’re happy to help! But why only go to events where you’re the one providing the value? At 7in7, everyone who comes has something valuable to share. Everyone can challenge you to be better. Everyone understands your lifestyle. You aren’t a subject of curiosity here… you’re with your people.

“At 7in7, everyone who comes has something valuable to share. Everyone can challenge you to be better. Everyone understands your lifestyle. You aren’t a subject of curiosity here… you’re with your people.”

 

 

Let’s talk a bit about representation in the world of remote work and travel. Now, more than ever, it’s easy for anyone to create their own platform and following. Do you think it’s a good thing or do you think that it adds to the rest of the noise in a world that people think is over saturated?

It’s SO important that there are more platforms being created every day because everyone has their own story to tell. In 2010, it was so exciting to meet another nomad in the wild that you were immediately best friends. Now, there are hundreds of thousands of us all over the world. We all need to find our people somehow. Especially those of us who haven’t felt represented in the wider space: queer nomads, nomads of color, transgender nomads – visibility is EVERYTHING.

It’s also important to find people who share your interests beyond just travel. I have a “Nerdy Nomads” WhatsApp group where I talk with friends about the latest comic book movies. I have a “Cat Crew Nomads” Facebook chat where we send photos of cats we find all over the world. Of course, you don’t have to create a platform to find these friends, but it is a fast way to do it! I have a Facebook Group for feminist nomads who listen to my podcast – and they are wonderful! I would never have met half of them if it weren’t for my podcast.

That being said, I encountered someone recently who thought that being a digital nomad meant you had to have a fancy Instagram presence. That’s not the case at all!

…those of us who haven’t felt represented in the wider space: queer nomads, nomads of color, transgender nomads – visibility is EVERYTHING.

 

How do you see the digital nomad sphere changing in the upcoming years?

Good question! I’m working to make sure we expand what it means to be location independent. Of course, it can mean traveling to 20 new cities every year, but it can also mean working full-time remote and having the opportunity to live in a small town you adore or stay home with your children or care for an aging parent or work part-time as a SCUBA instructor. The future of work – and life – is flexible. That’s what we need to redefine in the next 20 years.

 

How would you say that being location independent has changed your life?

A decade ago, I could never have imagined that my life would look like this. It’s everything I never knew I needed. I am in charge of every aspect of my own life. I live where I want to, I work how I want to, and I play when I want to. It’s the most empowering thing. I feel so much more confident.

 

What advice would you give someone who wants to run their own business and travel often?

I would say trust yourself and don’t worry when you make mistakes. Nothing is irreversible. When you fail, just get back up and try again.

 

Who is someone that you admire (whether you know them personally or not) and why?

Can I list every woman I know?! I get inspiration from all my friends!

But, keeping it simple, I’ll say Leanne Pittsford. She founded her own conference, Lesbians Who Tech, back in 2014. It was because of her example that I knew I could handle running my own conference. She’s turned her values into a tangible global community that has helped thousands of people.

My best advice is to find friends who make you want to be a better person.

 

After the 7in7 conference in Barcelona, you stayed at Sun and Co. How would you describe the experience here to someone who has never been before?

I loved Sun and Co! Immediately after we arrived everyone agreed there was something about the space and the town that was just so soothing. You can’t help but be relaxed and productive there! There’s guaranteed laughter and support every day!

 

If you could give yourself one piece of advice before starting your location independent journey, what would it be?

I made an entire podcast episode about this! Basically: stress less.

 

Imagine that you had one month to travel anywhere in the world (money not being an issue), where would you go and why?

I’d go around sub-saharan Africa staying in all the best hotels in each city and the most expensive eco-lodges on safari. Flying first-class in between! There’s so much of that continent I have yet to explore, but money and time always get in the way!

 

Lastly, where do you see yourself/what do you see yourself doing one year from now?

I know EXACTLY where I’ll be! 7in7 Year Four is happening in Australasia, so I’ll be in Australia or New Zealand scouting out venues and finding the best cat cafes!

Rapid Fire

Window or aisle? Always window!

Carryon or overweight? Carry-on only, baby!

Favorite city you’ve visited? This is impossible to answer. Ok, London.

Favorite tool for remote work? Calendly.

What song do you currently have on repeat? My brother’s latest.

Anything else you want to share? Just thinking about Sienna and the crew at Sun and Co makes me feel light and full of happiness! I can’t wait to see you all again!

Where can we find you on the web and social media?
https://twitter.com/kitwhelan
https://www.instagram.com/kitwhelan/
https://7in7.co/

 

Thanks so much for your time Kit! 

If you’re interested in attending 7in7 this year in Colombia, you can get your early bird tickets here!

Meet the Sun and Co. Team: Jon

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If you’ve been keeping up with our Meet the Team series, we’re sharing a bit about all of our team members so that you get to know us a bit better! Today, we’re introducing you to our co-founder Jon who makes sure that everyone feels happy and at home!

Are you ready to meet Jon?!

What do you at Sun and Co?

I’m in charge of the full Sun and Co. experience. From the first day you contact us until you arrive, you stay until you leave our home.  I’ll make sure all of the events, all of the connections and the operations are going as they should. The community is our biggest asset to Sun and Co., and I’m in charge of making it connect.

Outside of work, what do you love to do?

I love hanging out with friends, surfing, music festivals and watching football.

If you had to describe coliving in one word, what would it be?  

Belonging

 

What do you think makes Sun and Co. so special?

The hosts, the building, and Javea.

Hosts are the most important role in Sun and Co. where our key task is to build up the community. We do it through professional and social events. There is always so much knowledge in the house, and our job is to make our guests exchange it. At the same time, we get to know each other by doing things together, that’s why we host social activities nearly every day.

The building is perfectly designed to make people interact and connect. It’s truly coliving and coworking all under one roof.

Javea is a beautiful Spanish town by the sea and the perfect place to feel productive and inspired. 

 

What is one piece of advice you’d give to someone looking to become location independent?

Surround yourself with people you like. Being location independent can be a lonely experience sometimes. So whether you are traveling or based in one place, find your community. It’s critical.

 

What is your favorite thing about Javea?

I’ve been living in Javea for two years. The most important thing I learned after moving here is to understand the rhythm of a town. Life goes slower here. Living in a place like this helps me appreciate the little things more.

 

Biggest surprise since joining the Sun and Co. team?

I take it as something normal but your colleagues being your friends as well is priceless. The working environment among our team is reflected in our guests at Sun and Co. and that’s something essential.

Quick round off:

Favorite place you’ve ever traveled to: Cabo de Gata, Almeria – Spain.

Beach or mountain: Beach!

Carry-on or big suitcase: Carry-on!

Coffee or tea: Coffee!

Summer or winter: Summer!

3 Most Used Apps: Whatsapp, Kiwi & Asana

Favorite Song at the moment: Los Locos Son Ellos – La Maravillosa Orquesta del Alcohol

There you have it! We hope you feel like you know Jon a bit better. If you want to get to know more of our team, feel free to find out more about our visual director Hayley and our founder Edu!

Meet The Sun and Co. Team: Hayley

By | Community, Digital Nomad, Interview, The Team | No Comments

Next up in our Meet the Team series is Hayley! Hayley runs all of the visual content here and Sun and Co. and it’s time to get to know her a bit better!

It’s time to get to know Hayley!

 

Tell us a bit about you!

I’m 26 years old, originally from the Isle of Wight, England but I grew up here in Javea up until the age of 18 when I decided to experience city life in London for several years. From a young age, I was fascinated with cameras and exploring in nature with my family, with my first ever salary I spent it all on a camera and a large supply of film and study film and photography in London. After deciding to make a choice of leaving a secure monthly salary to pursue something I’ve always been passionate about, I looked at making my life remote… That’s when I discovered Sun and Co, here in my hometown and started towards turning my dream into reality!

I am someone who finds change very exciting, I love to meet new people and learning new things from others. I have a massive appetite for Mediterranean food and good home cooked roast dinner!

What do you at Sun and Co?

I’ve been at Sun and Co since February 2017 managing their Instagram account and visual content creation. Being present for skillshares, activities in the house as well as joining Colivers in the outdoor activities which brings me closer to the people staying with us. 

Outside of work, what do you love to do?

Outside of work I really love to be outside in wide open spaces 😀 I really enjoy exploring new places and hiking with my camera and friends, traveling to adventurous places and cooking or just pottering around my garden.

If you had to describe coliving in one word, what would it be?  

Connected

What do you think makes Sun and Co. so special?

The people

What is one piece of advice you’d give to someone looking to become location independent?

Don’t fear the change, it’s a very exciting part of the process

What is your favorite thing about Javea?

The landscapes

Biggest surprise since joining the Sun and Co. team?

How much I’ve learnt from those who have come to stay at Sun and Co.

Quick round off:

Favorite place you’ve ever traveled to: Iceland

Beach or mountain: Mountain

Carry-on or big suitcase: Carry-on

Coffee or tea: Uuff! Difficult choice, coffee in the summer, tea in the winter

Summer or winter: Both 🙂

3 Most Used Apps: Planoly, Lightroom & Asana

Favorite Song at the moment: Waterfall – Vok

Awesome! We hope you enjoyed getting to know Hayley a bit better. Just in case you missed it, check out our blog post with the Sun and Co. founder Edu here!

How To Tell That You’re Ready To Be Location Independent

By | Business, Digital Nomad, Remote Worker | No Comments

Let’s take a second to start with the basics.

What does it actually mean to be location independent?

It’s a term that has been moving around for a few years as we notice work dynamics changing and more people being able to escape the traditional office culture, being location independent is more and more common.

With people being able to earn a living from anywhere in the world, as long as they have internet access and a laptop, it allows for endless possibilities. Location independence doesn’t mean that you have to be moving from country to country every month, but it does mean that you have a sense of freedom and choice in where you call “home.”

As this movement is on the rise, many people are trying to decide if being location independent is the right fit for them. Here are three ways to know that you’re ready to start the journey.

You Care More About Experiences Than Material Things

We’ve been noticing a trend that more and more, people are focusing less on what they own and more on what experiences they’re having. While some of our society focuses on having a fancy car, big house and all of the latest technology, there are many people out there who would rather invest their money and energy into having unforgettable experiences.

People who are willing to be location independent are open and willing to live with less stuff and get rid of the unnecessary to live a more mobile lifestyle. So whether it’s moving to a new country for a year or backpacking through South America for three months, the time and devotion is shifted towards dedicating their money to travel and new experiences versus having more material objects.

 

You’re Willing To Be Patient With The Process

For most people, becoming 100% location independent is a process that often takes time getting used to. Of course, there are some hardships like leaving friends, family and your comfort zone behind but there are also endless benefits. If you’re willing to be patient with your process towards being able to live and work from wherever you want, then it might be the perfect next step for you.

It takes time to try out different things and places to see where the perfect fit is but when you have the right systems in place, you’ll be able to handle your new lifestyle with ease.

 

You Want To Live A Life That You’re Proud Of

This might be one of the most important ways to know that you’re ready to be location independent. Some people might strive to be location independent so that they can be like the people always sharing the perfect shot of a drink on the beach with their laptop but it’s more than that. Being location independent means that you’re able to create a life with a sense of freedom that you’re proud of. It means that you’re able to focus on the things that bring you joy and you’re willing to learn a lot about yourself in the process.

 

Have you ever thought about being location independent? We’d love to hear from you!

Digital Nomad? Here Are The Productivity Apps You Need

Digital Nomad? Here Are The Productivity Apps You Need!

By | Digital Nomad, Productivity, Remote Worker, Travel | No Comments

As a digital nomad, you’ll find that being productive while on the road can sometimes be difficult. From changing time zones to wanting to explore your new “home,” when it comes down to actually getting work done, things can be harder than expected.

Not to worry, being a remote worker you’ll learn that keeping track with your team, clients and to-do lists is pretty easy if you have the right tools.

Here are 5 productivity apps every digital nomad or remote worker needs while traveling the world.

Digital Nomad? Here Are The Productivity Apps You Need

Asana

Asana is an amazing project management tool that keeps you up-to-date with all of the latest things happening in the company you work for or for your own business. Not only that but it’s an efficient way to keep your co-workers or employees accountable, no matter where you are in the world. With calendars and a way to track project progress, you’ll be sure to keep on top of all of your work while still traveling the globe and enjoying your time doing so.

Not to mention, you can have the app downloaded on your phone but try to turn off the notifications while you’re on the beach! It’s all about learning how to #worksmarterlivebetter right?

Momentum

Momentum is an amazing Chrome extension that really helps sets you up for the day and inspires you at the same time. Whenever you open a new tab, it shows you the time, a personalized message, a place where you can share your main focus for the day and an inspirational quote at the bottom.

Not only that, but you’re able to input your to-do list for the day and check it off as you go and the extension also shows you the weather, wherever you are.

Headspace

Productivity isn’t just about putting the pen to the paper but it’s also about making sure that you feel centered. As a digital nomad or remote worker, sometimes staying centered can be a bit tricky but Headspace is an amazing app that helps you focus on just that. Even if you think you aren’t into meditation, it’s worth a try. All you need is a few minutes each day to take time out and be still and odds are, when you get back to work afterward, you’ll be more balanced and focused.

Digital Nomad - Productivity Apps

Toggl

When it comes to productivity and time tracking, Toggl is one app that you need to know. It’s the perfect way to see how much time you’re dedicating to certain clients and projects, while also making sure that when you’re working… you’re actually working. It’s so easy to get caught up in multi-tasking but with Toggl it really makes you focus on one thing at a time.

Workfrom

Workfrom is the perfect app for when you’re traveling because it breaks down the best coffee shops, bards, co-working spaces and places with WIFI all over the world. With almost 2,000 cities in its database, it’s the best place to scope out where you need to be so that you can be connected and productive all at a high speed.

 

There you have it! Here are some great apps that you can use to make sure that you’re productive while traveling on the word. Time to get to work!

 

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