Category

Remote Worker

How To Convince Your Boss To Let You Work Remotely

By | Business, Digital Nomad, Remote Worker | No Comments

Latest researches show that remote work is here to stay. Thanks to digital communication improvements, people from many different fields are now able to work remotely. Yet, many employees are still dreaming of a flexible work-life balance and the ability to determine when, where and how they work. There’s just one thing stopping them: their current job.

Too often, we look at our current situation and see no way of changing the traditional 9-5 schedule, confined to the four walls of a conventional office. You might love your job, but crave the flexible lifestyle that you know you can have.

Before you start updating your resume and beginning to search for a new position, have you ever considered pitching the idea of a remote position to your current employer? Of course this may require some preparation on your end before initiating the conversation, in order to help your boss feel comfortable with the idea of you becoming a remote employee.

Here are five top tips that will help you to convince your boss to let you work remotely.

Choose The Right Time

If peak season or a particular busy time is coming up, this might be the best time for you to approach your boss. Why? Many times managers will be looking for employees to put in some overtime to meet deadlines, so the argument can be made that instead of spending time commuting, you can complete extra work in a space with no distractions.

Know Your Worth and Document All Your Wins

At least three months before you talk to your manager, start documenting all of your contributions, performance results, and what you’ve been doing that benefits the team and company. If you can quantify your value to your boss, you will have greater leverage when making the argument that you will be more productive and creative while working with more autonomy.

Do Your Research

Preparation is the key to success, so come to the table with research to back up your ask, i.e. bring a list of the pros and cons of remote work, particularly when it applies to you and your company, or do some research on how companies that allow greater flexibility with their employers could help attract and retain talent.

For example, a recent survey by the Society of Human Resources Management found that of those who work remotely at least a few times a month, 77% reported greater productivity while working offsite, and 30% said they accomplished more in less time. And LinkedIn data show that 51% of professionals say they are proudest to work at companies that promote work-life balance and flexibility.

By creating a well-informed case that shows how allowing you to work remotely is a win-win for both parties, you can convince your employer to grant you greater flexibility.

Suggest a Remote Work Trial Period

When you’re ready to start approach your boss, decide on a trial time frame that works for you based on your job and workload (one month, three months, six months, etc.) and ask what they think. Giving your employer an alternative to an all-or-nothing proposition makes it a lot easier for them to say yes.

Put Your Employer’s Interests First and Be Flexible

Before introducing the subject of remote work to your boss, you need to be ready to explain how personal benefits – flexible work schedule, work-life balance, less time commuting, a more relaxed job environment etc. – will translate into benefits for your employer.

Think about the “why” of why you want to go remote, and focus on how your “why” will help the company. By digging deep into your motivation for moving to remote work, you’ll also be able to anticipate concerns your employer might have and respond to them proactively.

Finally, let your boss know that you’re flexible and open to compromising. For example, you could agree on something like sending a full report of what you plan to do and accomplish every week on Monday. Or you could offer to come in for face-to-face meetings throughout the week, perhaps moving it to regular video calls once your boss becomes more accustomed to the idea of remote work. Accommodating your employer when asking for a remote arrangement is critical, especially at the beginning or during your trial period.

These are some of our top tips that we hope will help you to present your case for remote work to your current employer. If your manager is open to trying it out, congratulations! You now just need to make sure to keep yourself organised and productive, so that your boss will let you transition into even more remote and flexible work over time.  And if they’re not, you won’t have lost anything by trying—in fact, you’ll simply know where you’re employer stands on remote work, and that you need to start looking into new remote job options if you’re serious about making the change.

Three Benefits Of Organizing A Company Retreat

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When thinking about company culture and how to effectively engage your employees, a few things come into play. Whether you’re a fully remote team, looking to transition or a company that wants to start innovating with how you’re showing your employees that you care, something that should be put into consideration is organizing a team retreat at least once a year.

Team retreats are on the rise as companies begin to realize that employees are valuing immersive experiences over everything and aim to have immersive experiences in their day to day lives. When thinking about bringing your team together, there are some unexpected benefits to organizing a company retreat.

Let’s talk dive into them and see how you can get started today.

Bring Company Culture Front And Center

Company culture is a hot topic where many businesses talk the talk but don’t necessarily walk the walk in their day to day team culture. Hosting a team retreat is a great way for a company to show its employees firsthand the type of culture that they want to have.

When you bring your whole team to a beautiful location, you’ll be able to inspire them and also show them a look inside the values that a company has. It’s not just about getting work done but also about the overall vibe and atmosphere that you’re looking to bring in the activities that you do.

Whether you choose to bring your team on a paddleboarding or kayaking adventure, maybe wine tasting or tapas… it will be able to show them what the culture is like behind the company.

Increase Employee Engagement

When you bring your team to a new location and innovate with activities in an offsite retreat, it allows for employees to not just feel seen and appreciated but also get them to engage with others on a different level.

Professional development is a big part of employee engagement with 87% of millennial workers stating that it’s important to them in their work. Taking time for workshops and learning opportunities in retreats can motivate top employees to continue learning and growing.

Being outside of the office and in new environments, it also allows for your team to share different talents, skills and knowledge that you might not see in normal day to day activities.

Work Smarter So Your Team Can Live Better

Work smarter, live better is our motto here at Sun and Co. and over 300 remote workers who have stayed with us are adopting the same mentality and want their employers to follow it too.

With 6 out of 10 millennials stating that work/life balance is very important to them when thinking about the companies they want to work for, your retreats shouldn’t just be about meetings, work and innovative ideas, but also incorporate social activities where teams can bond.

Company retreats are just one of the many ways for teams to feel better connected, valued and efficient so that they can do their best work. When bringing everyone together for a period of time it allows for purposeful connection, innovation and deeper connection.

If you’re thinking about hosting a company retreat, feel free to send us an email at sienna@sun-and-co.com. You don’t need to do any of the heavy lifting, we’ll handle all the details so that all you need to think about is arriving.

How a Workation Can Increase Productivity

By | Digital Nomad, Javea, Productivity, Remote Worker, Travel | No Comments

With today technology and the increasing number of people becoming location independent, the old idea of taking a vacation to disconnect in order to reboot your productivity just doesn’t make sense anymore.

Instead, a workation might be the solution to make you more productive and focused on your work, whether you are a freelance, entrepreneur, or a company’s employee.

What Is a Workation and Why You Should Try It

Workation (literally work + vacation) is something more than just casually checking emails while you travel. It means actually fully immersing yourself in your work, while also dedicating time to unwind and relax, exploring a new environment, trying new things, meeting new people etc.

There’s no doubt that spending time in a different environment can make you feel more inspired and come up with innovative ideas and solutions for your work. We see this every day at Sun and Co., with our guests choosing to take a workation with us to escape winter in their home countries or spend time in beautiful Javea. After two or three weeks they all go back feeling better at way they do.

This being said, there are a few rules you should follow for a real productive workation.

Surround Yourself With Like-Minded People

When you go on workation, it’s important that you take your working mood with you. Having people around you that are also on a mission to immerse themselves in work helps a lot when it comes to motivation and not getting off the course.

Set Expectations

Before you leave for your workation, make sure that both yourself and everyone else (coworkers, clients, travel companions etc.) understands that working is actually going to be the main focus of your trip. Setting the right expectations means avoiding disappointment when sometimes you will have to stay inside and work on some urgent task, instead of going out to enjoy the sunny weather and beautiful spanish beaches. But it also means that your clients or coworkers back home won’t freak out when you’re not responding to an email straight away. Of course you will, you are not just on holiday!

Choose Your Accommodation Wisely

The place you stay will play a great role when it comes to your productivity, so it’s important to make sure you get all of these things:

A good internet connection;

A desk you can sit and work at;

An environment that is quite and peaceful, but also has places and activities nearby for when you want to change your setting or go explore.

Places like Sun and Co. offer all these three and much more, which is why coliving with us makes our guests always feeling super productive!

Establish a routine

From day one, try to set yourself a schedule and stick to it throughout your workation. Having the same schedule every day will help you stay organised, plan your time more effectively, and avoid pushing things off for later. Here are some of our favourite apps for an extra help on stay productive.

Stay in the same place for the entire trip

Traveling from one place to another not only takes time, but it also requires a lot of energy. Besides, If you’re traveling somewhere new every 3-7 days you won’t be able to fully take in the area, which on the long run will make you feel lonely and disconnected.  2-6 weeks is ideal for workationing and it will give you enough time to get used to the new environment, find a spot you can work, establish a routine and ultimately do good work.

 

Now that you know the rules for a productive workation, why not starting to plan your first or next one in Javea? Check out our availability or make an enquiry!

5 Tips to Hire Top Talents For Your Remote Team

5 Tips to Hire Top Talents For Your Remote Team

By | Business, Guest Blog, Remote Worker | No Comments

Going remote can be daunting at first when you want to build and scale a business or agency, but as long as you hire the right team members straight off the bat, you’re well on the road to success. The top talents aren’t drifters; rather, they’ll stick around for the long haul, which is exactly what you want.

However, the hiring process has for a long time saddled all businesses. When we don’t hire the right people, productivity slows down, morale drops, and we have to spend money repeating the process until we get the right person in.

The last thing we want is to hire an individual who suddenly vanishes from the online world.

For your company to be a success, you need to bring the A-players to your team. The thing is that, with everyone working remotely, you might need to be a bit more creative with how you identify and “seduce” the top talent.

Let’s take a look at 5 tips to hire top talents for your remote team.

 

5 Tips to Hire Top Talents For Your Remote Team

Know Where to Look

There are a variety of places to look for remote workers, from Craigslist to LinkedIn.

LinkedIn is one of the best places to find your next hire because you get the advantage of seeing an individuals resume, testimonials and credentials there and then. Plus, they’re just a DM away. If you do decide to use LinkedIn, switching to a recruiters account gives you access to perks that a regular account doesn’t have. Then, you need to use keywords like “remote graphic designer” to find potential hires.

Moreover, if a talent really is the best talent, it’s highly likely that they’ll be on LinkedIn. And they’ll probably have examples of their work for you to browse.

Global freelance platforms like Upwork and Freelancer are worth taking a look at, too. These hubs allow clients to post jobs — long term or short term — and multiple businesses have used them to hire the best talent. The problem is that, while there are top-rated remote workers on these sites, there are also lots of dead wood, too. As such, it might take you some time before you find the right person for the right job. However, these platforms allow clients to give freelancers feedback and scores so that you can take a look at an applicants profile to determine how skillful, motivated and reliable they’ll be for you.

 

Outline Your Why

The best remote workers don’t have to work for you. Unlike an office worker who might be terrified of being made redundant because they’ll never find another job, the best remote workers always have other clients they can work for.

This is why you need to sell the job to them.

Outline your company’s ‘Why’. Why should someone work for you? Share your company’s vision with remote workers. Explain your purpose and where your company is heading. What are the perks of working for you? Why should the best talent choose you?

The more attractive you can make your company appear, the easier it will be for the top talent to want to be a part of your future.

 

Go for the Experience

When assessing who is right and who isn’t for your team, it’s a good idea to take a look at how experienced the remote worker is. This doesn’t simply mean how experienced they are in terms of the role — it also means how experienced they are as a remote worker.

For example, if someone has literally just started working remotely, it might not always be the best idea to hire them. They could be a starstruck remote worker who quit the 9-5 grind in the hopes that working remotely would bring them a better work/life balance. Ultimately, however, they have no track record and you don’t know how motivated they’ll be as a remote worker.

Instead, it’s much safer to go for remote workers who already have a proven track record working remotely. If they’ve been doing this for 2+ years now and have strong testimonials to back them up, they’re well worth considering over young pups who may end up like rabbits caught in headlights. They might be good at what they do, but are you taking a gamble?

 

Assign a Test Project

When hiring a remote worker, it’s typical for a company to assign the candidates a test project first. This gives you a better insight into the quality of their work, as well as the speed at which they work. Turnaround time is key, so it makes sense to test each candidate first with a small (but paid) project.

 

Be Communicative

The top talent wants to see a few things from a prospective company they might work for before they commit. One of them is good communication.

The best talent know that communication is the bedrock of all good working relationships, and it’s important to remember the reasons why someone has decided to work remotely in the first place. It might be that they did it for family reasons, but a prime factor is often that the individual doesn’t want to work for a boss they hate anymore.

The top talent can pick and choose who they work for. If they no longer want stress in their working life, they won’t work with someone they dislike.

Poor communication skills can easily make you appear unappealing to a remote worker. If you take too long to respond to messages, or if your messages are often blunt, impersonal and full of criticism, it’s going to put the best talent off.

Be a good communicator. Be friendly, personable and open. Stay in touch with your prospects and your hires. Offer feedback and offer criticism, but offer praise, too. Be positive. That way, it will be a lot easier to hire and keep hold of the best remote talent.

 

These are 5 top tips to hire top talents for your remote team. Look in the right places, sell your company to the worker, go for the experience, run a test project by them and be communicative. If you can do all this, you should be well on your way to building a stronger team.

 

About the author: Aljaz Fajmut is a digital marketer, internet entrepreneur, and the founder of Nightwatch a search visibility tool of the next generation. Check out Nightwatch blog and follow him on Twitter: @aljazfajmut

How To Stay Productive While Traveling

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Mojito on the beach with Gmail open on the computer screen. If we believed everything we saw on Instagram, that’s what it would look like when you’re someone who works and travels at the same time. If you’re actually one of those people, you know that the reality looks a bit different.

Whether you have a home base and travel occasionally or you’re a full-time digital nomad who is always on the road, the reality is… work still has to get done. Being productive in different places can sometimes be harder than what it seems but we’re here to share some more tips on how to do so.

The Colivers in our community are some of the smartest people we know with such a wide range of experience so we decided to go to the source. We asked them how do they aim to stay productive while working remotely or on the road and this is what they had to say!

“Get Serious About Your Workspace”

Rachel says… Get serious about your workspace–spend some time finding a good place to work that is comfortable and meets all or most of your needs and then keep going back. Knowing what you are going to do and where you are going to do it gives some structure to the workday.

 

“Dress Up”

Chelsea’s advice: When I’m working remotely and don’t have to go into an office I’m more productive when I dress up, versus staying in my pajamas, even if I’m not going anywhere. Then when I’m finished with my tasks, I reward myself by just walking around the town I’m in – since I’m already dressed ;).

“Get Inspired”

Ann Kathrin says; For me, as an illustrator and graphic designer, it really helps me to be productive to get inspired by the local art and culture scene. Whether it’s a trip to a museum during the day, a visit to a theater or just sitting in a cafe and watch the everyday life around me.

 

“Plan Your Week”

 

Alex believes that you need to… plan your week so that it’s always clear what you’ve got to do next. It makes the distractions less tempting.

 

 

“Exercise Between Tasks”

 

Ella says; Go out for a walk or run in between tasks. It helps me to clear my head and focus more when I get back to my work. And it’s great to get some sun and see the surroundings while you’re at it.

 

 

 

“Make Location Work For You”

Ali says; My favorite productivity travel hack is to use the location freedom to help me focus. I choose a project to complete at each location whether it be a coffee shop, or even one desk versus the sofa in a co-working space. Once the project is complete (or a few tasks if they are smaller) I change locations. The new surroundings help me refocus and the time it takes to get up and walk around helps me get some fresh air and re-charge. 

 

Hopefully these tips will give you a good starting point for things you can do to stay productive while on the road! Of course, productivity doesn’t always mean being in front of your computer for 8 hours a day. In our eyes, when you’re truly productive, that’s the key to #worksmarterlivebetter.

 

Diverse Representation As a Digital Nomad; An Interview with Kit Whelan

By | Community, Digital Nomad, Interview, Remote Worker, Travel | No Comments

Kit Whelan is one of those passionate people that you meet and instantly feel inspired to be a better person and change the world. We had the honor of spending time with her at the 7in7 conference as well as afterward, as they hosted the Nomad House here at Sun and Co. 

We decided to sit down with Kit to hear a bit more about how she’s able to be location independent, the importance of diversity in the digital nomad world, how we need to be redefining the future of work in the next 20 years and so much more! 

Without saying anything about work, tell us a little bit about who you are and what you value.

I LOVE this question! I’ve been a digital nomad for 9 years and the only thing I miss about muggle life is being able to have a cat – I’m a certified crazy cat lady! The best thing about my life is my awesome community of location independent humans all over the world who support me through life’s ups and downs. They help me become the best person I can be. I’m never without my amazing friends.

Aaaand does running a conference count as work if it’s an all-volunteer project? Because I started a conference to make more friends. That’s how important community is to me 🙂

I also plan to travel in space one day, hopefully to Mars.

So, what do you do that allows you to be location independent?

I’m a social media consultant, mostly for small luxury hotels.

 

Tell us a little bit about why you started the 7in7 conference.

“This bromad culture turned off so many people that a lot of my friends refused to call themselves digital nomads. They couldn’t stand to be associated with those types of people. Something had to change.”

 

We started 7in7 out of frustration. First, frustration with the lack of representation in the nomad community. EVERYWHERE you looked it was all straight, white, Western men. Every conference, meetup, article, podcast… all white guys talking about how to “crush it” at life. This bromad culture turned off so many people that a lot of my friends refused to call themselves digital nomads. They couldn’t stand to be associated with those types of people. Something had to change.

Secondly, frustration that there were so many events geared toward getting people into the location independent lifestyle, but nothing for those of us who had already been nomads for a while. We had already figured out the basics – starting a business or getting a remote job, the logistics of travel, etc. But there’s so much more to life than that: building a community, being a socially responsible global citizen, deciding whether or not to have kids on the road… we needed a space to have these conversations.

So, we started our own.

As for doing it on seven continents… that bit is just for fun! 🙂

 

Since starting 7in7, how have you seen your network change?

Oh my gosh! People say if you want to increase your visibility you should speak at conferences… that’s true. But if you want to increase your network, and fill your global village with wonderful humans, start your own event! I have met such incredible people over the last three years! And they introduce me to their friends, and their friends, and on and on. Anything I need, there’s someone in my network who can help me get it. They push me to be better. They offer their skills to create a better world. They are everything to me.

The focus of the conference is for “experienced digital nomads”.

 

Tell us a bit about why you chose to focus on those who have been traveling and working for years.

Yes, this is a bit controversial. We are the only event I know of for experienced location independent people (those who have been at it for more than one year) and that’s intentional.

When you’ve been a nomad for 3, 5, or 15 years, you often find yourself in spaces where you are the most experienced person in the room. You end up being asked questions by everyone else, and of course, you’re happy to help! But why only go to events where you’re the one providing the value? At 7in7, everyone who comes has something valuable to share. Everyone can challenge you to be better. Everyone understands your lifestyle. You aren’t a subject of curiosity here… you’re with your people.

“At 7in7, everyone who comes has something valuable to share. Everyone can challenge you to be better. Everyone understands your lifestyle. You aren’t a subject of curiosity here… you’re with your people.”

 

 

Let’s talk a bit about representation in the world of remote work and travel. Now, more than ever, it’s easy for anyone to create their own platform and following. Do you think it’s a good thing or do you think that it adds to the rest of the noise in a world that people think is over saturated?

It’s SO important that there are more platforms being created every day because everyone has their own story to tell. In 2010, it was so exciting to meet another nomad in the wild that you were immediately best friends. Now, there are hundreds of thousands of us all over the world. We all need to find our people somehow. Especially those of us who haven’t felt represented in the wider space: queer nomads, nomads of color, transgender nomads – visibility is EVERYTHING.

It’s also important to find people who share your interests beyond just travel. I have a “Nerdy Nomads” WhatsApp group where I talk with friends about the latest comic book movies. I have a “Cat Crew Nomads” Facebook chat where we send photos of cats we find all over the world. Of course, you don’t have to create a platform to find these friends, but it is a fast way to do it! I have a Facebook Group for feminist nomads who listen to my podcast – and they are wonderful! I would never have met half of them if it weren’t for my podcast.

That being said, I encountered someone recently who thought that being a digital nomad meant you had to have a fancy Instagram presence. That’s not the case at all!

…those of us who haven’t felt represented in the wider space: queer nomads, nomads of color, transgender nomads – visibility is EVERYTHING.

 

How do you see the digital nomad sphere changing in the upcoming years?

Good question! I’m working to make sure we expand what it means to be location independent. Of course, it can mean traveling to 20 new cities every year, but it can also mean working full-time remote and having the opportunity to live in a small town you adore or stay home with your children or care for an aging parent or work part-time as a SCUBA instructor. The future of work – and life – is flexible. That’s what we need to redefine in the next 20 years.

 

How would you say that being location independent has changed your life?

A decade ago, I could never have imagined that my life would look like this. It’s everything I never knew I needed. I am in charge of every aspect of my own life. I live where I want to, I work how I want to, and I play when I want to. It’s the most empowering thing. I feel so much more confident.

 

What advice would you give someone who wants to run their own business and travel often?

I would say trust yourself and don’t worry when you make mistakes. Nothing is irreversible. When you fail, just get back up and try again.

 

Who is someone that you admire (whether you know them personally or not) and why?

Can I list every woman I know?! I get inspiration from all my friends!

But, keeping it simple, I’ll say Leanne Pittsford. She founded her own conference, Lesbians Who Tech, back in 2014. It was because of her example that I knew I could handle running my own conference. She’s turned her values into a tangible global community that has helped thousands of people.

My best advice is to find friends who make you want to be a better person.

 

After the 7in7 conference in Barcelona, you stayed at Sun and Co. How would you describe the experience here to someone who has never been before?

I loved Sun and Co! Immediately after we arrived everyone agreed there was something about the space and the town that was just so soothing. You can’t help but be relaxed and productive there! There’s guaranteed laughter and support every day!

 

If you could give yourself one piece of advice before starting your location independent journey, what would it be?

I made an entire podcast episode about this! Basically: stress less.

 

Imagine that you had one month to travel anywhere in the world (money not being an issue), where would you go and why?

I’d go around sub-saharan Africa staying in all the best hotels in each city and the most expensive eco-lodges on safari. Flying first-class in between! There’s so much of that continent I have yet to explore, but money and time always get in the way!

 

Lastly, where do you see yourself/what do you see yourself doing one year from now?

I know EXACTLY where I’ll be! 7in7 Year Four is happening in Australasia, so I’ll be in Australia or New Zealand scouting out venues and finding the best cat cafes!

Rapid Fire

Window or aisle? Always window!

Carryon or overweight? Carry-on only, baby!

Favorite city you’ve visited? This is impossible to answer. Ok, London.

Favorite tool for remote work? Calendly.

What song do you currently have on repeat? My brother’s latest.

Anything else you want to share? Just thinking about Sienna and the crew at Sun and Co makes me feel light and full of happiness! I can’t wait to see you all again!

Where can we find you on the web and social media?
https://twitter.com/kitwhelan
https://www.instagram.com/kitwhelan/
https://7in7.co/

 

Thanks so much for your time Kit! 

If you’re interested in attending 7in7 this year in Colombia, you can get your early bird tickets here!

Mastering Remote Work: 3 Ways To Improve Team Culture

By | Business, Productivity, Remote Worker | No Comments

Being a full-time remote worker definitely has its benefits but if we’re being honest… sometimes it can be hard to navigate the world of remote work 24/7. If you’re used to office environments and coffee banter, sometimes it can be an isolating experience but it doesn’t have to be that way.

With the future of work inevitably leading to more companies having remote employees and more people being brought on to teams so they can work from anywhere in the world… it’s vital to have the right tactics in place both as an employee and an employer.

There are some companies who do remote work really well and one of those is Hanno, a business that focuses on helping organizations build and launch life-changing products. The team is 100% remote and does all of their collaborations online, even with their clients. We had the pleasure of connecting with Laila, the Remote Work Mentor of the Hanno team to teach the Sun and Co. community about Remote Team Culture and now we’re going to share some of the takeaways with you!

Keep Your Systems Effective

One of the biggest hardships of being on a fully remote team can be systems and organizations. We asked Laila how do they keep their systems effective both within their team and with their clients as well.

In their company, they have “playbooks” which are perfect both when onboarding new team members as well as frequenting them in their day-to-day work situations. When you have guidelines within a team it not only helps you figure out how you do your work internally but it also helps your clients understand how you work as a remote business… just in case they need some clarity or have never worked with a brand remotely before.

Keeping systems effective also means that team communication is transparent on all fronts. They use something called Everyday PPP which stands for Plan, Progress and Process. It allows for everyone to be able to check in with one another and be able to keep everyone on the team accountable.

 

Connect On A Deeper Level

Sometimes when working remotely, it can be a bit difficult to connect with your coworkers on a deeper level outside of the meetings and daily tasks that you have ahead.

Some different ways to combat that and connect on a deeper level as a team?

Implementing things like check-ins before your meeting. It helps you all open up about how you’re feeling and get to know what’s going on with your teammates outside of work.

Another way to connect with teammates is having activities like “Friday Beer or Coffee” to be informal. Hanno hosts this weekly so that there is time within their team for informal chatting and connecting on a different level.

 

Know What Tools You Need

What is so impressive about the Hanno team is that although their business focuses on creating and implementing new projects and services for their clients, they are truly thought-leaders when it comes to remote work culture and efficiency.

They don’t just help their clients learn how to work remotely and be more efficient but they also help thousands of other people in the world learn how to implement better remote work practices via various online resources.

What tools could be useful to you and your team?

Here are some things you probably haven’t heard of before when it comes to thinking about what your team needs and what you can use to help with productivity and collaboration working remotely.

Remote Starter Kit: The Hanno overview of all the tools that you need to help your team collaborate better and be happier.

Oskar: The tool you never knew you needed. A bot that helps track your team’s happiness via Slack!

Donut: A site that helps you build amazing company culture online.

Reinventing Organizations: Laila recommends reading this book when you’re thinking about your own company culture and how to work better as a team and a new way of rethinking how an organization works and operates on a daily basis.

Do you work or lead a remote team? What tools and practices do you use to keep everyone organized, efficient and happy? Let us know in the comments! 

Why Coliving Is The Future of Remote Working

By | Business, Remote Worker, Travel | No Comments

What do professional growth, clarity and coliving have to do with one another?

Let’s take a moment and think about why people long for vacation or “workation” in remote working terms.

Why do we look to explore new places and have a change of scenery? More often than not, we escape to find clarity and gain a new understanding of how we see the world and our place in it. So what does all of this have to do with coliving? And what is coliving?

Coliving is something that is on the rise and we believe is the future of remote working. Over the years, we’ve found that many people join us at Sun and Co. when they are in search for a sense of clarity or change in their lives: transitioning to new business fields, looking for new job opportunities, working on side projects…

The list goes on, but we’ve heard over and over again from Colivers that once they leave Sun and Co., they have a sense of clarity that wasn’t there before.

So time to dive into three ways that coliving won’t just give you a sense of overall clarity, but will also lead to professional growth!

Learn From The Expertise Of Others

One of the most impactful things that happen on a weekly basis at Sun and Co. is skillshares. At the beginning of each week, we share what everyone in the house wants to learn and who can provide meaningful content on those topics. It’s an amazing opportunity to learn from others and then apply it to your own situation and professional experience. With a wide range of topics like Facebook ad funnels, email marketing, blogging, SEO and even things like risk-taking probabilities… you’re constantly able to get out of your professional comfort zone and learn from those who specialize in different topics.

Meet Your New Business Partner 

When most people think about professional networking, they envision swanky lunches or meeting people at conferences. You rarely think about your new business partner or colleague being someone you wake up and have breakfast with for two weeks. That’s the beauty about coliving: you’re not just sharing a workspace where you go in and out at the end of each day. You’re also living together and getting to know one another on a deeper level. This way you can skip the resume and boring interview process and get right to the good stuff when it comes to working together or hiring someone new because you were able to connect on a deeper level from Day One.

Time and time again, we see people who have met at Sun and Co. end up hiring each other later on, freelancing for another coliver’s companies and even leading joint ventures together.

Stay Inspired By Your Surroundings

The beauty of being location independent is that you can choose to be based in a place like Javea, where you’re constantly surrounded by inspiration. And if you choose coliving at Sun and Co., you will also find endless inspiration in the house itself.

With sleek architecture and a minimalist, homey vibe, it’s easy to be productive and get the meaningful work done. That’s what we had in mind when renovating this 19th-century house. An inspiring space. Tall glass windows. Open workspace. Closed office spaces. Tons of natural light. Outdoor patios. And lots of plants!

Time to think about if you’re ready to take the next step in your life and career.

Are you ready to be in a new environment, connect with other like-minded people and spend your days inspired by where you are and what you’re doing? If so, we’re here to welcome you with open arms!

3 Unconventional Ways To Find Remote Work

By | Business, Remote Worker | No Comments

Succeeding as a remote worker is something that is more attainable than most people think. Whether you’ve been on the scene for a while or you’re looking to transition from your 9 to 5 office job, not to worry, securing remote work in your field is getting easier by the day.

When you’re able to find work that doesn’t tie you down to a specific location or area, it creates a world of endless benefits; not only does it allow you to be location independent (meaning you can live anywhere in the world) but it also fosters productivity, allows you to create your own schedule and more often than not… comes with an increased sense of happiness and fulfillment.

We’re moving away from a time where developers and coders are the only people who are able to work remotely. Now, there is an endless number of job opportunities in various fields that allow almost anyone to be able to secure a remote gig but the biggest challenge for many is figuring out how to find a remote job.

Luckily for you, we’re going to share some inside knowledge on 3 of our favorite ways to find remote work.

 

Targeted Websites

The easiest route to finding remote job opportunities would be a simple Google search, but it can be really difficult to sift through everything that there is out there. It’s important to find promotions that you can trust and with a bit more clarity on what they have to offer. That’s why we love websites like Workew that allow you to post your resume and get free daily job alerts for a variety of professions. Websites like these are the best way to have filtered opportunities delivered right to your inbox from remote companies like Spotify, Remote Year, and more. With over 150 companies, it’s easy to find something that’s the right fit for you.

Word Of Mouth

Another great, yet often underutilized way to gain new job opportunities is by word of mouth and networking in different groups. When you’re vocal about the work you do and the services that you offer, it allows people to keep you top of mind when it comes to new job opportunities and offers that they know of.

According to a Nielsen report, 92% of people trust recommendations that they hear from friends and family over other sources of marketing and they’d be more apt to hire someone that is a “friend of a friend”. When you’re consistently sharing your work, availability and openness to remote job opportunities, it can open up a new world of professional opportunities.

Facebook Groups

Facebook might be the least conventional way to find remote work but it works just the same. Most people hone in on LinkedIn when thinking about social networks to find work opportunities but with the rise of Facebook groups that focus on remote work and the digital nomad lifestyle; you’re able to find ample opportunities and conversations regards job opportunities or new freelance positions within various companies.

Staying tuned into various conversations in Facebook groups might allow for you to encounter job offers for remote work, especially if the groups you’re participating in have a focus of remote work, travel and location independence.

What unconventional tips or tricks do you have for finding new job opportunities that allow you to work smarter and live better from anywhere in the world?

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